Thursday, April 19, 2012

Hamburger Jun - Korean Hamburger Patties

Hamburger Jun is the poor man’s version of MeatJun.  I think it was dreamt up in Hawaii because I haven't seen it anywhere else.  In my opinion, hamburger jun taste like a beef bulgogi burger with a meat jun finish.  Delish!

This was one of the first things that I cooked when I moved out on my own.  It fulfilled all the important criteria that mattered back in the day... It was cheap, fast and easy, with a punch of flavor that would keep my popularity rating high, at least in the kitchen.  So if you are craving the flavor of meat jun, but only have the budget for a pound of ground beef, this recipe is your new best friend.

You could make these as I have for years, egg dipped and fried, or you could simply shape them and cook them on the bbq or under the broiler for a no fry version.  Either way would be delicious.  But don’t skip the sauce it really kicks up the flavor (and after you make the base sauce, consider adding some or all of the options).

I have never thought to eat these with anything but rice (my Hawaii roots) until today when I looked outside and saw the sun shining (rare experience in Oregon).  It got me thinking… I bet this flavor packed burger would be absolutely delicious between a bun.

HAMBURGER JUN – Korean Beef Patties
The Patties
1              pound                   ground beef
2              Tbsp.                     green onions, minced
1              tsp.                        garlic, minced
1              tsp.                        ginger, minced
1 ½         Tbsp.                     soy sauce
¼             tsp.                        black pepper
1              large                      egg
2              tsp.                        brown sugar
1              tsp.                        sesame seeds, toasted
1              tsp.                        sesame oil
Mix all the ingredients together and form into patties.
The Egg Dip
2              large                      eggs, beaten
½             cup                         flour
Place egg and flour in separate dishes.  Coat patties in flour then the egg
Cook over med low heat in a non-stick frying pan with about 1 Tbsp. oil.  Poke holes on the back side of the burgers with a chop stick so they will cook evenly.  Wipe out pan in between batches.
The Korean Vinegar Sauce
2          Tbsp.   soy sauce
1          Tbsp.   sugar
1          Tbsp.   white vinegar
Dash                black pepper
1          tsp.      toasted sesame seeds
*At this point the sauce is finished.
or
You can add any of these optional additions to kick up the flavor if you choose.
2          tsp.      Ko Choo Jung paste, this will make it spicy
¼         tsp.      ginger, minced
1/8       tsp.      garlic, minced
1          Tbsp.   green onion, minced

Place all ingredients in a bowl and mix well to dissolve sugar.  Pour into small dishes and serve along side the meat for dipping.


To toast sesame seeds;
Place them in a dry pan over med low heat and move them around until they are golden brown.

22 comments:

  1. Looks delicious, Susan! Are these too big to be called dongeurangddeng? Back in the days when we didn't have burger places in Korea, mom used to make hamburgers with similar patties like these.

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    1. Hyosun, I looked it up after I got your comment and Yes,I think these are dongeurangddeng. So this recipe must have sailed to Hawaii from Korea a long time ago. As always, thank you for your insight!

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  2. Tried the beef stew last night and the hamburger jun tonight. I'm so excited I found this site and can't wait to try more! I used ground turkey because that's all I had and it turned out pretty good! (Irvine,CA)

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    1. Thanks for stopping by my kitchen Irvine, CA!

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  3. we used to have this all the time as a kid! LOVE them. i think i'll have to make these soon!

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    1. Aloha Amy, Thanks for stopping by. I encourage you to cook up a batch. It will surely take you back to your keiki days:)

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  4. Meat jun is based on the Korean gogi jun. Here is a post about the dish: http://tastingkorea.blogspot.com/2011/10/origin-of-meat-jun.html

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    1. This dish is comforting to me and takes me back home to Hawaii whenever I make it. I never imagined that hamburger jun had such a history. Thanks for stopping by and for the history lesson :).

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  5. I wonder if I could make little meatballs and use for appetizers. Has anyone ever tried this?

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    1. These would make delicious meatballs! This recipe will give you about 8 golf ball or 10 cocktail sized meatballs. I would suggest that you roll them into balls and place them on a sheet pan that has been lightly sprayed with pan coating and bake them in a 350 degree oven for 25 - 30 minutes (depending on the size) turning them once halfway through the cooking time,instead of egg dipping and frying.

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  6. Wow, I always wondered if anyone else made hamburger jun. The internet is such a wonderful tool. I too grew up eating this as my mom would cook this for dinner on occasion. Although she has passed, I'm glad she taught me how to make it so that I can keep the Hawaii/Korean tradition alive!

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    1. Hi Kristin; thanks for stopping by and sharing your story with me. Sorry to hear about your mom, but the way I see it - your mom is still alive...in you :)

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  7. I had forgotten about these - I worked off and on at Kim Chee I Restaurant In Kaneohe as a Cook, and the owners Husband used to grab a big handful of pee-soaked bulgogi rib eye and either throw it in the food processor or give it a real fine chop with the cleaver till it looked like hamburger. Then, he made patties and make them like your recipes. They where so flavorful , you didn't even need sauce ! He also stuffed these long, sweet Korean peppers that (two different types of korean peppers hot and sweet , look EXACTLY the same) he slit up the side, removed the seeds , and stuffed with the same mixture, and cooked like meat jun. Ahhh, good foodie memories ! I need to make some :D

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    1. Aloha Robert, Mahalo for the foodie memory! I know that you meant to write "pre" soaked bulgogi above, whoops - but I got it :). I will have to try it stuffed in peppers, that sounds so delicious. Kim Chee I... wow, that was a long time ago. I'm not sure, but I think there is a Kim Chee III now. I remember this place all to well. I never went to the one in Kaneohe,but I did frequent the Kaimuki location. Monstrous portions of ono grinds. Thanks for the stopping by!

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  8. O my, these are sooo good! I worked at a Korean restaurant in Kaneohe called Kim Chee I. My boss would take bulgogi we made from beef ribeye, chop it fine with a bit of onion , make patties and then cook it meat jun style. So unbelievably good! Hamburger works just as good. He would also use the same as stuffing for these Korean peppers ( a non-hot variety that tasted much like bell pepper) , slit them, remove the seeds and stuff them..then cook them meat jun style as well. Making my mouth water, thanks for the memories and the recipe :)

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  9. Yum. I make my burger almost exactly the same, but I have never dipped the outside in egg & flour. Will have to try that next time.

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    1. Hi Erlene, Thanks for stopping by :) Don't forget the rice and dipping sauce!

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  10. I live in Oregon as well as I'm from Hawaii:-) I love your recipes!!

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    1. Aloha Dre, It is always nice to meet a fellow Hawaiian! Mahalo - It always makes me happy to hear when someone enjoys my recipes. A hui hou!

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